epic women

Dedicated to anything and everything about the mortal (and not quite mortal) women involved in the Trojan War/Epic Cycle.

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eliaofdorrne:

mythology meme » [3/9] Greek Gods/Goddesses 

Circe was a minor goddess of m a g i c.  She was renowned for her vast knowledge of drugs and herbs. Through the use of magical potions and a wand she transformed her enemies, or those who offended her, into animals.  Namely in the Odyssey when she invited Odysseus' crew to a feast of familiar food, a pottage of cheese and meal, sweetened with honey and laced with wine, but also laced with one of her magical potions. Thus she turned them all into swine with a wand after they gorged themselves on it.

(Source: colesaintsclair)

[Matt Fraction is] writing ODY-C in six-syllable dactylic hexameter, the same poetic way Homer did, “because I can’t do anything simply,” Fraction says with a laugh. He’ll use the rhythm “until it becomes inconvenient, and then (expletive) it, that’s a dumb idea.”

Like her ancient male counterpart, Odyssia is the captain of a crew who’ve been at war for 10 years and just want to go home, though they run into lotus-eaters (in the second issue) and other familiar aspects for Homer-philes.

"She is crafty and wily and she’s the mother trickster who won the war with the big ideas and big plans," says Fraction, who even has a riff on the Trojan Horse that was born of a maternal thread. (x)

(Source: helruna)

shrinemaidens:

MYTHIC POETRY series:

No: you’ll still mumble in a corner a crust of truth, to men and gods disgusting. [“Cassandra” — Robinson Jeffers]

manticoreimaginary:

favourite faces for favourite mythic ladies: Electra with Camilla Belle

In such a state, my friends, one cannot
be moderate and restrained nor pious either.
Evil is all around me, evil
is what I am compelled to practice.

artsytoad:

Charles Vess, Circe and Her Swine
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artsytoad:

Charles Vess, Circe and Her Swine

1 month ago | 39 notes
Source: artsytoad
Tagged: #circe 
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chrestomatheia:

Jérôme-Martin Langlois, Cassandra begging Minerva for vengeance on Ajax, 1810.
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chrestomatheia:

Jérôme-Martin Langlois, Cassandra begging Minerva for vengeance on Ajax, 1810.

cloudyskiesandcatharsis:

Diomedes and Athena, Schlossbrücke, Berlin
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cloudyskiesandcatharsis:

Diomedes and Athena, Schlossbrücke, Berlin

kecobe:

Dora Wheeler Keith (American; 1856–1940)Penelope Unraveling Her Work at NightSilk embroidered with silk thread, 1886Embroidered panel made for Associated Artists (1883–1907)The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Thus she: at once the generous train complies,Nor fraud mistrusts in virtue’s fair disguise.The work she plied; but, studious of delay,By night reversed the labours of the day.While thrice the sun his annual journey made,The conscious lamp the midnight fraud survey’d;Unheard, unseen, three years her arts prevail;The fourth her maid unfolds the amazing tale.We saw, as unperceived we took our stand,The backward labours of her faithless hand.Then urged, she perfects her illustrious toils;A wondrous monument of female wiles!Odyssey, Book II (translated by Alexander Pope)
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kecobe:

Dora Wheeler Keith (American; 1856–1940)
Penelope Unraveling Her Work at Night
Silk embroidered with silk thread, 1886
Embroidered panel made for Associated Artists (1883–1907)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Thus she: at once the generous train complies,
Nor fraud mistrusts in virtue’s fair disguise.
The work she plied; but, studious of delay,
By night reversed the labours of the day.
While thrice the sun his annual journey made,
The conscious lamp the midnight fraud survey’d;
Unheard, unseen, three years her arts prevail;
The fourth her maid unfolds the amazing tale.
We saw, as unperceived we took our stand,
The backward labours of her faithless hand.
Then urged, she perfects her illustrious toils;
A wondrous monument of female wiles!
Odyssey, Book II (translated by Alexander Pope)